Thank you for visiting TWE.

Monday

Monday

The Comfort Animal Insanity Grows

The U.S. Department of Transportation has announced that miniature horses are still officially allowed to fly as service animals in all cabins of commercial planes, in a statement aiming to define the guidelines regarding protections for emotional support and psychiatric service cats, dogs and the tiny equines.

An Overview: Why Hong Kong is protesting: Their five demands listed

Hong Kong belongs to China, but it has its own currency, political system and cultural identity. Many Hong Kong residents don’t see themselves as Chinese, but rather as Hong Kongers.

That difference goes back generations; the city was a colony and territory of the United Kingdom for more than 150 years, until the British handed it back over to China in 1997. Today, Hong Kong’s legal system still mirrors the British model, prizing transparency and due process.

A policy dubbed “one country, two systems,” enshrines this uniqueness. Under the policy, Hong Kong’s maintains a de-facto constitution, known as the Hong Kong Basic Law. It guarantees freedoms that are unavailable to Chinese mainlanders, such as the right to protest, the right to a free press and freedom of speech.

Satire

The Green New Deal was laughed off as unrealistic when it was first introduced. But its architects were not deterred by the haters and pressed on trying to iron out the details of the plan that will soon save the world.

In particular, their plan to get rid of all cars seemed to be slightly farfetched, as well as their promises to pave the streets with gold and give everyone a carbon-neutral unicorn.

While the GND’s proponents are still stumped by the unicorn question, they’ve finally come up with a workable solution for the transportation portion of the plan: the government will provide every person in the country with a guy running behind him or her banging two empty coconut halves together to simulate the sound of a horse galloping.

Mixing MMA and Romance: Inside Life as the Better Half of a Cage Fighter

They started dating and then married. Ivette went to Ike’s fights in the UFC. It wasn’t easy to watch, and all the fans screaming obscenities at Ike was tough to handle. But it wasn’t that bad, she says. She could handle it, and she taught herself how to block out the audience and focus on Ike.

Arrested Development?

When 37-year-old Jack recently brought a woman back to his house after a date, she was taken aback by his spare room. Stacked in neat boxes from the floor to the ceiling, exactly 1,080 plastic figurines fill the rec room in Jack’s California home. Over the past four years, the grape farmer — who is identified here by a pseudonym — has spent more than $9,000 on the toys.

Each of Jack’s toys has a pair of large, vacant black eyes, a square head, and a disproportionately small body. They are Pop Vinyl figurines, created by the 20-year-old company Funko Inc., based in Washington state, and launched in 2011. Known to fans simply as “Funko Pops,” each toy is based on a pop culture character, and according to the official Funko App, there are now 8,366 different figures. Alongside the expected superheroes, you can buy Funko Pops of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the Pillsbury Doughboy, Tupac Shakur, Abraham Lincoln, Cece from New Girl, a shark from Sharknado, and the son of the creator of Vans shoes, Steve Van Doren. Everyone, the official Funko motto goes, is a fan of something.

(Picture: Mackinac Island)

Tuesday

Tuesday

Friday

Friday